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Your Favorite SAHM’s Tips for Staying in the House

Updated: Dec 8, 2020

As most of you know, I’ve been a stay at home mom (SAHM) for a little over 3 years. With COVID-19 spreading, that’s not likely to change. These last 3 years, I can honestly say that I’ve been super productive. I started two businesses (only one is active now), learned new skills, and gotten better at old ones.


I know that being a SAHM isn’t nearly the same thing as being quarantined, however I still feel like there’s a lot of overlap in how we can all get through this. I’m always down to help if I can, so here is a list of tips and tricks (and recipes) you can use if you’re self-quarantining or social distancing.


Get ready for the longest blog post I’ve ever written.


Note: there are no affiliate links in this post.



Food

Somewhat understandably, grocery store shelves are being cleared out. But is anyone paying attention to the fresh food? Likely not, since it expires faster than the canned stuff. Generally, fresh food is cheaper, so I’m going to talk about how to use, reuse, and save it to help save you a few coins.


Meat

If you don’t have a deep freezer or and industrial freezer, you probably thing that your meat is going to go bad after a few days. I’m happy to tell you that is not the case. (Full disclosure: we have a deep freezer. Highly recommend getting one if you have the money and storage space.)


According to an article on Huffington Post, these are the freezer times for meat:

  • Cooked poultry — 4 months

  • Uncooked poultry parts — 9 months

  • Uncooked whole poultry — 12 months

  • Cooked meat — 2 to 3 months

  • Uncooked roasts — 4 to 12 months

  • Uncooked steaks or chops — 4 to 12 months

  • Uncooked ground meat — 3 to 4 months


Like seafood? Me too! Here are The Spruce Eats’s freezer times for seafood:

  • Fatty Fish (such as bluefish, mackerel, salmon) — 3 months

  • Lean or White Fish (cod, flounder, haddock, sole) — 6 months

  • Crab (cooked) — 2 months

  • Crab (raw or live) — 3 months

  • Crayfish (raw) — 4 months

  • Lobster (cooked) — 2 months

  • Lobster (raw/live) — 3 months

  • Shellfish (cooked) — 3 months

  • Shrimp (raw) — 4 months

  • Squid, Octopus, or Calamari (raw) — 4 months





Veggies & Fruit

One best ways I’ve learned to save veggies and fruit is to freeze them. According to an article on The Spruce Eats, these are freezer times for fruits and veggies.


  • Commercially Frozen Vegetables — 1 year stored in original package

  • Asparagus — 1 year

  • Avocado — 5 months

  • Beets — 1 year

  • Bell or Sweet Peppers and Chile Peppers — 3 to 4 months

  • Broccoli — 1 year

  • Carrots — 1 year

  • Cauliflower — 1 year

  • Celery — 1 year

  • Corn — 8 months

  • Green or Wax beans — 1 year

  • Leafy greens — 8 months

  • Mushrooms (cooked) — 1 year

  • Mushrooms (raw) — 8 months

  • Peas — 8 months

  • Tomatoes — 3 to 4 months

  • Winter Squash and Pumpkin (cooked) — 1 year

  • Zucchini and Summer Squash — 8 months

  • Commercially Frozen — 1 year

  • Apples — 4 months

  • Apricots — 6 months

  • Bananas — 8 months

  • Cherries — 6 months

  • Cranberries — 1 year

  • Peaches — 4 months